Category Archives: Authors

The History of Afternoon Tea – Author Event

afternoon-teaThe Nom Nom Nom Cookery Book Reader Group invites you to join them on Saturday 1 April  2.00-3.30pm  at Wakefield Library. Cookery author and blogger Meryl White will explore the origins and the characters involved in creating this quintessential British tradition and what makes the perfect afternoon tea. This is a free event but booking is essential please.

To book:

Tel 01924 305356

Email wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

The Nom Nom Nom! Cookery book reader group was established in March 2014 meeting monthly, whose members are interested in food and cookery and want to share experiences and recipes with like-minded individuals. Members of all cooking abilities are welcome, you don’t have to be of bake-off or masterchef standard to enjoy your food and cooking it!

The Nom, Nom, Nom book group meets on the first Saturday of each month 2-3pm at  Wakefield Library and Museum at Wakefield One, Burton Street. The book club gives members the opportunity to try new cookery writers, ingredients and experiment with different cuisines and share their results (and disasters!) within a friendly group.

Visit Meryl’s blog at http://www.grandmaabson.com/

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Cookery author event – Grandma Abson’s Traditional Baking

The Nom Nom Nom cookery book reader group, which meets regularly

Grandma Abson's Butterscotch Cake (4)

Doncaster Butterscotch Cake

at Wakefield One Library and Museum the first Saturday each month at 2pm, invites you to join us for an afternoon of tea, cakes and Edwardian recipes from Grandma Abson’s vintage recipe book. On Saturday 5th March 2.00-3.00pm author Meryl White will be talking about her book and sharing some tasty home-baked treats. Read more about Grandma Abson’s legacy on Meryl’s blog

 

“Grandma Abson’s Traditional Baking is all about simple and tasty baking, a legacy from my Grandma’s time as a

Flakemeal biscuits (5)

Irish Flakemeal Biscuits

cook-housekeeper in Edwardian times and a lifetime of baking. As I was growing up, I watched her bake and cook, and acquired her expertise and passion for baking. Now I’m sharing Grandma Abson’s baking with you. Enjoy!” – Meryl White, Author

 

Free event but booking is essential please

GAcover

Wakefield Library and Museum

Wakefield One, Burton Street

Wakefield WF1 2DD

Tel 01924 305356

Email wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

Double the pleasure

Herring_Girl_cover x24237_books_origjpg_jpg_pagespeed_ic_M9XjDRZYcw

Don’t miss our next author event on Wednesday 24 June when we have not one but two authors introducing their novels. The talk will start at 7.15 pm but do join us before for tea and coffee. The event is free but please contact Wakefield Library on 01924 305376 to reserve a place.

Our authors are Debbie Taylor and Robert Williams.

Debbie Taylor is the founder and Editorial Director of Mslexia. She has worked as Editor at New Internationalist and Writing Women magazines and as a writer, research­er and project manager for many organisations, including Oxfam, Anti-Slavery, BBC 2, Channel 4, UNICEF and WHO. Her novels include The Fourth Queen and Hungry Ghosts. She lives in a decommissioned lighthouse at the mouth of the Tyne with her husband and daughter.

Her novel Herring Girl is a time-slip novel investigating a century-old murder and the possibility of reincar­n­ation. It centres on a schoolboy called Ben who wants a sex-change because he believes he has literally been born into the wrong body. Debbie says ”The book is set on the bank of the River Tyne in North Shields where I live, in two main time periods: 1898 at the peak of the herring fishing boom, and 2007 over a century later. I’ve been calling it a historical paranormal romantic crime mystery – why stick to one genre when you can have four?”

Robert Williams grew up in Clitheroe, Lancashire and currently lives in Manchester. His first novel, Luke and Jon, won a Betty Trask Award, was translated into six languages and called ‘a hugely impressive debut’ in the Daily Telegraph. His second novel, How the Trouble Started, was shortlisted for the Portico Prize for Fiction. He has worked in a secondary school library, as a bookseller for Waterstones, and has written and released music under the name The Library Trust.

Into the Trees grew from a single image: that of a baby screaming inconsolably, an exhausted father holding her late in the night, comforting, singing for her, all to no avail; this is a baby that will not be soothed. It develops into a story of a traumatic night under the ancient trees of Bleasdale Forest and its aftermath. Robert says ”
I think the book is about imperfect lives. How people strive and fail, but sometimes succeed, in living the life that is in front of them, not the life they would have chosen necessarily, but that one that is there to be lived.”

Come and meet them on 24 June and contact your library if you would like a copy of either of the books to read before the event.

Dementia Positive

Author photo Book Coiver

Join us at Sandal Library to meet author John Killick who has worked for many years exploring communication with people with dementia through a wide variety of arts activities He will be talking about his book Dementia Positive and sharing creative writing from people with dementia. You can find out more about his work here

Monday 15 June, 2pm

Sandal Library
Sparable Lane
Sandal
Wakefield WF1 5LJ

Free event but booking is essential please
Tel 01924 303355
Email sandallibrary@wakefield.gov.uk

Desmond Elliott Prize

Desmond-Elliott_longlist-books

It’s always good to discover a new author and one of the best places to start is the Desmond Elliott Prize. The longlist for 2015 has been announced and includes books by debut authors that are already bestsellers and exciting titles that need this list to attract the attention they deserve. I loved The Miniaturist for it’s atmospheric portrait of 17th century Amsterdam, and The Bees (also on the Baileys Prize shortlist) is competing with A Song for Issy Bradley to be my next read. Have you read any of these books? Do post your views and reviews. The full list is

• The A to Z of You and Me by James Hannah (Doubleday)

• The Bees by Laline Paull (Fourth Estate)

• Chop Chop by Simon Wroe (Viking)

• Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey (Viking)

• Glass by Alex Christofi (Serpent’s Tail)

• The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton (Picador)

• Our Endless Numbered Days by Claire Fuller (Fig Tree)

• Randall by Jonathan Gibbs (Galley Beggar Press)

• A Song for Issy Bradley by Carys Bray (Hutchinson)

• The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth (Unbound)

The Prize is presented in the name of the late, acclaimed publisher and literary agent Desmond Elliott, whose passion for finding and nurturing new authors is perpetuated by his Prize. Now in its eighth year, the award has an established record for spotting up-and-coming novelists in the UK and Ireland and propelling them to greater recognition and success. The 2014 winner was Eimear McBride, author of the much-garlanded and critically lauded A Girl is a Half-formed Thing. Other past winners include Grace McCleen, Anjali Joseph, Edward Hogan and Ali Shaw.
The shortlist will be announced on 15th May and the winner on 1st July.

Juliet Barker

julietportrait England, Arise PR2

For anyone who enjoys history, we have a treat in store on Wednesday 15 April 6 – 8pm.
Historian and biographer Juliet Barker will be joining us to talk about her book England, Arise: The People, the King and the Great Revolt of 1381. The Great Revolt is often called The Peasant’s Revolt. Juliet says ”This is a book of two halves. The first is a snapshot of what English life was really like in town and countryside in 1381 which helps to set the scene for the Great Revolt and explains how and why it happened. The second is a detailed account of the revolt itself, following its course across Essex and Kent then spreading throughout the south east and East Anglia and as far afield as Yorkshire and Somerset. And as anyone who’s read any of my books before will expect, it’s full of entertaining stories which bring the people and period to extraordinary life, from Margery Starre who danced around the bonfire of the Cambridge University archives shouting ‘Away with the learning of clerks! Away with it!’ to the sad tale of John Giboun, who’s evidence was used to convict and hang his own son.”

The evening begins with ‘Skeleton Secrets, 6-7pm. Drop in to chat to the knowledgable staff of Wakefield Museum about medieval bones and what they can tell us about diet and lifestyles of the period.

Juliet will be speaking from 7-8pm, with a chance to buy an autograped copy of her books afterwards.

This is going to be a fascinating evening so book early to ensure a place. The evening is free but please book for the Juliet Barker talk by phoning Wakefield Library on 01924 305376 or emailing wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

Requiem

requiem-2014 berlie-site-header-2014

Award winning author Berlie Doherty will be at Wakefield Library on Thursday 26 March, 2 – 3.30pm. Berlie is famous as the author of over 60 books for children, teenagers and adults, and has written many plays for radio, theatre and television as well as stories set to music and opera librettos. She has been translated into over twenty languages and has won many awards, including the Carnegie medal for both Granny Was a Buffer Girl and Dear Nobody; and the Writers’ Guild Award for both Daughter of the Sea and the theatre version of Dear Nobody.Her latest book is Far from Home, telling the story of what happened to the sisters of Jim, hero of her classic Street Child.
Berlie will be talking about Requiem, a novel for adults, set in rural Ireland and later in Venice. Requiem is the powerful and haunting story of a young woman’s search for self-fulfilment as she struggles against both the love of her close Irish family and the seductive discipline of her convent upbringing.
Join us for afternoon tea on Thursday 26 March to meet Berlie and hear about her work.

Free event but booking is requested please

Wakefield Library and Museum
Wakefield One, Burton Street
Wakefield WF1 2DD
Tel 01924 305376
Email wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

The Temporary Bride

Jennifer Klinec Temporary Bride

We have some exciting and fascinating authors visting Wakefield Library this spring. The season start with a memoir of love and food in an Iranian Kitchen and an opportunity to sample Persian chai. Don’t miss it!

Saturday 7 March 2.00-3.30pm

Jennifer Klinec will be takling about her book The Temporary Bride.

”A relationship was a mathematical formula: the correct variables of age, beauty, morality and finances were entered and the output was a successful, peaceful marriage. It couldn’t be, therefore, that their Iranian son could feel desire for someone six years his senior, someone who didn’t come to him pure and untouched. I was an amusing visitor from another world and soon enough I should return to it, fading quietly into an anecdote …”

In her thirties, Jennifer Klinec abandons a corporate job to launch a cooking school from her London flat. Raised in Canada to Hungarian-Croatian parents, she has already travelled to countries most people are fearful of, in search of ancient recipes. Her quest leads her to Iran where, hair discreetly covered and eyes modest, she is introduced to a local woman who will teach her the secrets of the Persian kitchen.

Vahid, her son, is suspicious of the strange foreigner who turns up in his mother’s kitchen; he is unused to seeing an independent woman. But a compelling attraction pulls them together and then pits them against harsh Iranian laws and customs.

Getting under the skin of one of the most complex and fascinating nations on earth, The Temporary Bride is a soaring story of being loved, being fed, and the struggle to belong

The Nom Nom Nom Cookery Book Group invites you to join them on Saturday 7 March when author Jennifer Klinec will be talking about her book The Temporary Bride: a memoir of love and food in Iran and demonstrating how to make Persian Chai.

Free event but booking is requested please

Wakefield Library and Museum
Wakefield One, Burton Street
Wakefield WF1 2DD
Tel 01924 305376
Email wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

From Wakefield to Covent Garden, ‘Sausage Hall’ has found great friends!

Enjoying ‘Tea at Sausage Hall’ with author Christina James. As always, I was impressed by our Readers Group members, never at a loss for an intelligent question or a lively debate. Watch out for details of our exciting author events next Spring, which will be available soon.

Christina James, crime novelist

Launching 'Sausage Hall' at Wakefield Launching ‘Sausage Hall’ at Wakefield

This is the final post on my launch week activities for Sausage Hall.  I’m covering the last two events: Tea at Sausage Hall, an imaginative tea-party given last Wednesday by Alison Cassels, Lynne Holroyd, Claire Pickering and their colleagues at the Wakefield Library at Wakefield One, which regular readers of this blog will know has provided me with granite-strength support ever since In the Familywas published two years ago,

Tea at Sausage Hall (And yes, there was cake!) Tea at Sausage Hall (And yes, there was cake!)

and an evening of conversation and readings at the Covent Garden branch of Waterstones, rounding off the celebrations with a London launch on Thursday.

Ever resourceful, Alison and her team provided sausage rolls, cake (Yes, there was cake!) and biscuits for the tea party.  (Her e-mail to me when organising the event reads ‘Can you put chocolate cake in the title of your next…

View original post 705 more words

National Book Awards shortlists announced

National-Book-AwardsPresented in association with high street campaign Books Are My Bag, the National Book Awards 2014 will celebrate writers in 10 categories. Readers will be asked to vote for their favourite from each of the category winners to win the Specsavers National Book of the Year Award which will be decided by a public poll on the official National Book Awards website, with the winner announced on 26th December, with a reception to follow at 11 Downing Street, residence of the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Man Booker-shortlisted Ali Smith, Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction winner Eimear McBride, and Costa Book of the Year winner Nathan Filer are among the authors vying at the Specsavers National Book Awards this year.with nominees also including Mary Berry, Caitlin Moran, David Walliams and John Cleese. The full list of those shortlisted and the categories is below. See more here 

SHORTLISTS FOR THE SPECSAVERS NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS 2014 

Crime/Thriller Book of the Year:Horowitz

• Moriarty by Anthony Horowitz (Orion)

• The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith (Little Brown Book Group)

• I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes (Transworld)

• The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah (HarperCollins UK)

• Personal by Lee Child (Transworld)

 

Magic FM Autobiography/Biography of the Year:ST Cleese

• The Unexpected Professor by John Carey (Faber & Faber)

• So, Anyway… by John Cleese (Penguin Random House)

• Napoleon The Great by Andrew Roberts (Penguin)

• Only When I Laugh by Paul Merton (Ebury Publishing)

• Please, Mister Postman by Alan Johnson (Transworld)

 

Food & Drink Book of the Year:images

• The Art Of Eating Well by Jasmine & Melissa Hemsley (Ebury Publishing)

• Mary Berry Cooks by Mary Berry (Ebury Publishing)

• Tom Kerridge’s Best Ever Dishes by Tom Kerridge (Bloomsbury)

• Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi (Ebury Publishing)

• River Cottage Light & Easy by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (Bloomsbury)

 

Children’s Book of the Year:

• Animalium by Jenny Broom & Katie Scott (Bonnier Publishing)images (1)

• Archie Green And The Magician’s Secret by D D Everest (Faber & Faber)

• Awful Auntie by David Walliams (HarperCollins)

• Goth Girl And The Fete Worse Than Death by Chris Riddell (Pan Macmillan)

• Minecraft: The Official Construction Handbook by Matthew Neeler and Phil Southam (Egmont)

 

Audible.co.uk Audiobook of the Year:

• Awful Auntie by David Walliams (HarperCollins)images (2)

• More Fool Me by Stephen Fry (Random House Audio)

• Walking Home by Clare Balding (Penguin Audio)

• The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell (Whole Story Audiobooks)

• Man At The Helm by Nina Stibbe (Audible Studios)

 

International Author of the Year:

• The Girl Who Saved The King Of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson (HarperCollins)images (3)

• Burial Rites by Hannah Kent (Pan Macmillan)

• A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride (Faber & Faber)

• The Long Haul / Wimpy Kid Series by Jeff Kinney (Penguin)

• We Are All Completely Beside Ourselved by Karen Joy Fowler (Profile Books)

 

Books Are My Bag New Writer of the Year:

• Elizabeth Missing by Emma Healey (Penguin Books)images (4)

• In The Light Of What We Know by Zia Haider Rahman (Pan Macmillan)

• Love, Nina by Nina Stibbe (Penguin Books)

• The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton (Pan Macmillan)

• Wake by Anna Hope (Transworld)

 

Specsavers Popular Fiction Book of the Year:

• The Shock Of The Fall by Nathan Filer (HarperCollins)images (5)

• Elizabeth Missing by Emma Healey (Penguin Books)

• How To Build A Girl by Caitlin Moran (Ebury Publishing)

• Taxidermist’s Daughter by Kate Mosse (Orion)

• Secrets Of The Lighthouse by Santa Montefiore (Simon & Schuster UK Ltd)

 

Non-fiction Book of the Year:

• Curious by Rebecca Front (Orion)images (6)

• How To Speak Money by John Lanchaster (Faber & Faber)

• Love, Nina by Nina Stibbe (Penguin Books)

• Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys by Viv Albertine (Faber & Faber)

• Waterloo: The History Of Four Days, Three Armies And Three Battles by Bernard Cornwell (Harper Collins)

 

UK Author of the Year:

• How To Be Both by Ali Smith (Penguin General)images (7)

• The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters

• Us by David Nicholls (Hodder & Stoughton)

• The Love Song Of Miss Queenie Hennessy by Rachel Royce (Transworld)

• The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell (Hodder & Stoughton)

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