Read Regional 2015

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It’s Read Regional time once again. Every year this scheme introduces library users to new titles by authors based in the north of England. This year there are 10 exciting titles to explore.
There are five novels:
Letters to my Husband by Stephanie Butland
The Last King of Lydia by Tim Leach
The Quick by Lauren Owen
Herring Girl by Debbie Taylor
Into the Trees by Robert Williams

Three books of poetry:
Ellen Phethean: Portrait of the Quince as an Older Woman
Helen Tookey: Missel-Child
John Wedgwood Clarke: Ghost Pot

a novel for young people, Hate by Alan Gibbons and finally a graphic novel, Sally Heathcote, Suffragette by Mary and Bryan Talbot. If you have never tried reading a novel in graphic form why not give this a try. Their graphic novel Dotter of her Father’s Eyes won the Costa Biography Award in 2013.

You can find out more about the books on the Read Regional webpage and the books are available in libraries or for some titles, as reader group sets. Lauren Owen, Debbie Willams and Robert Williams will be visiting Wakefield to talk about their books (see our What’s On page for details) and Alan Gibbons will be speaking to classes from a local school. Treat yourself to a selction of the finest new writing from the north this Spring.

Desmond Elliott Prize

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It’s always good to discover a new author and one of the best places to start is the Desmond Elliott Prize. The longlist for 2015 has been announced and includes books by debut authors that are already bestsellers and exciting titles that need this list to attract the attention they deserve. I loved The Miniaturist for it’s atmospheric portrait of 17th century Amsterdam, and The Bees (also on the Baileys Prize shortlist) is competing with A Song for Issy Bradley to be my next read. Have you read any of these books? Do post your views and reviews. The full list is

• The A to Z of You and Me by James Hannah (Doubleday)

• The Bees by Laline Paull (Fourth Estate)

• Chop Chop by Simon Wroe (Viking)

• Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey (Viking)

• Glass by Alex Christofi (Serpent’s Tail)

• The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton (Picador)

• Our Endless Numbered Days by Claire Fuller (Fig Tree)

• Randall by Jonathan Gibbs (Galley Beggar Press)

• A Song for Issy Bradley by Carys Bray (Hutchinson)

• The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth (Unbound)

The Prize is presented in the name of the late, acclaimed publisher and literary agent Desmond Elliott, whose passion for finding and nurturing new authors is perpetuated by his Prize. Now in its eighth year, the award has an established record for spotting up-and-coming novelists in the UK and Ireland and propelling them to greater recognition and success. The 2014 winner was Eimear McBride, author of the much-garlanded and critically lauded A Girl is a Half-formed Thing. Other past winners include Grace McCleen, Anjali Joseph, Edward Hogan and Ali Shaw.
The shortlist will be announced on 15th May and the winner on 1st July.

Books on Prescription: Dementia

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Reading Well Books on Prescription for dementia recommends books you might find helpful if you have dementia, are caring for someone with dementia or want to find out more about the condition. The books include information and advice, help after diagnosis, practical support for carers and personal stories. The books have been recommended by health professionals and tried and tested by people with experience of dementia.

All the books are available in Wakefield Libraries and can be reserved free at a branch or online.

If you have concerns about Alzheimer’s disease or about any other form of dementia, the Alzheimer’s Society National Dementia Helpline can provide information, support, advice and referrals to other appropriate organisations. Call 0300 222 1122

Information and advice

Introduction to the Psychology of Ageing for Non-specialists by Ian Stuart Hamilton
Coping with Memory Problems by Sallie Baxendale
Alzheimers: Answers at your Fingertips by Alex Bailey
Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease & Other Dementias by Nori Graham and James Warner
ABC of Dementia edited by Bernard Coope and Felicity Richards
About Dementia: For People with Learning Disabilities by Karen Dodd, Vicky Turk and Michelle Christmas
Grandma by Jessica Shepherd


Living well with dementia

First Steps to Living with Dementia by Simon Atkins
Dementia Positive by John Killick
Hearing the Person with Dementia: Person-centred Approaches to Communication for Families and Caregivers by Bernie McCarthy
Chocolate Rain: 100 Ideas for a Creative Approach to Activities in Dementia Care by Sarah Zoutewelle-Morris
Pictures to Share (various titles) by Helen Bate

Support for relatives and carers

When Someone You Love Has Dementia by Susan Elliot-Wright
And Still the Music Plays: Stories of People with Dementia by Graham Stokes
Can I Tell You about Dementia? A Guide for Family, Friends and Carers with Jude Welton
Dementia: Support for Family and Friends by Dave Pulsford and Rachel Thompson
10 Helpful Hints for Carers: Practical Solutions for Carers Living with People with Dementia by June Andrews
Seeing Beyond Dementia: A Handbook for Carers with English as a Second Language by Rita Salomon

Personal stories

Dancing with Dementia: My Story of Living Positively with Dementia by Christine Bryden
Dear Dementia: The Laughter and the Tears by Ian Donaghy
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Losing Clive to Younger Onset Dementia: One Family’s Story by Helen Beaumont
Telling Tales about Dementia: Experiences of Caring by Lucy Whitman
The Little Girl in the Radiator: Mum, Alzheimer’s and Me by Martin Slevin
But Then Something Happened: A Story of Everyday Dementia by Chris Carling

Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction

Baileys

The longlist for the Bailey’s Women’s prize for Fiction has been announced. I would love to be able to read every book on this list but I know I will have to be selective. What a great list to choose from though. There is Ali Smith and Rachel Cusk, both also nominated for the Folio Prize, Sarah Waters and Anne Tyler who already have so many fans and Emma Healey whose debut novel Elizabeth is missing was described as outstanding by the Costa Prize judges. There are quirky choices like The Bees by Laline Paull which is on my reading list already and Pythonesque comedy in The Table of Less Valued Knights by Marie Phillips, and more than one novel described as post-apocalyptic. Pictured above are the judges Shami Chakrabarti, the Director of Library, Laura Bates, writer and Founder of The Everyday Sexism Project, Grace Dent, Columnist and Broadcaster, novelist Helen Dunmore and news presenter Cathy Newman.

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Copies of all the books on the longlist will shortly be avilable in libraries so start reading and see if you agree with the judges. The shortlist will be announced on 13 April and the winner on 3 June.

Rachel Cusk: Outline

Lissa Evans: Crooked Heart

Patricia Ferguson: Aren’t We Sisters?

Xiaolu Guo: I Am China

Samantha Harvey: Dear Thief

Emma Healey: Elizabeth is Missing

Emily St. John Mandel: Station Eleven

Grace McCleen: The Offering

Sandra Newman: The Country of Ice Cream Star

Heather O’Neil: The Girl Who Was Saturday Night

Laline Paull: The Bees

Marie Phillips: The Table of Less Valued Knights

Rachel Seiffert: The Walk Home

Kamila Shamsie: A God in Every Stone

Ali Smith: How to be Both

Sara Taylor: The Shore

Anne Tyler: A Spool of Blue Thread

Sarah Waters: The Paying Guests

Jemma Wayne: After Before

PP Wong: The Life of a Banana

World Book Day

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Thursday 5 March is World Book Day and libraries are celebrating with storytimes based on the much loved book ‘Room on the Broom’ by Julia Donaldson. This is to celebrate the opening of an exciting new Room on the Broom Adventure Trail at Anglers Country Park on 5th March. It’s free and fun for all the family, so call in to Anglers to explore!

Children under five can also pick up a free voucher at library storytimes. This can be exchanged for a choice of special books produced for World Book Day books at participating shops. Visit the website to find out more about World Book day including games, competitions and story videos. Contact your local library to find out details of their World Book day storytimes.

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Bookstart Bear is always very excited by World Book Day as he is setting off on a Grand Tour of libraries. He will be enjoying the stories and joining in with the all the rhymes and actions and the happy booky fun!
You can meet him here:

Wednesday 25 Feb Featherstone Library 10 – 10.30
Thursday 26 Feb Castleford Forum 10 – 11
Friday 27 Feb Wakefield Library 10 – 11
Horbury Library 2.15 – 3
Tuesday 3 Mar South Elmsall Library 9.30 – 10.30
Wakefield Library 1.30 – 2.30
Wednesday 4 Mar Ossett Library 10.30 – 11
Tues 10 Mar Normanton Library 10.10.30
Wed 11 Mar Pontefract Library 9.30 – 11.30

For teenagers, tell them about Teen Fest 6-8pm on 4 and 5 March. Two amazing free online evenings with fantastic authors taking part in Hangouts and interviews, how-tos, blogposts, playlists, prizes as well as the chance to chat with other readers and writers.

Any cover as long as it’s black…

TW running TW rising TW Moor TW meadowland

TW hawk TW claxton TW Ash TW brit

I haven’t come across the Thwaites Wainwright Prize before.It’s only in its second year and is to promote and reward books about the general outdoors, nature and UK-based travel. Literary writing about nature has a fine history in the UK from The Rev Gilbert White’s The Natural History of Selborne (1789) onwards and the longlist for this prize shows some interesting additions to the genre.
There is H is for Hawk of course, a feature on every literary prize list at the moment, Adam Thorpe writing about Silbury Hill and Oliver Rackham on Ash trees. Counting Sheep by Philip Walling sounds interesting: full of stories, history, trivia and humour, Counting Sheep explores Britain through its most influential animal.

The prizes is sponsored by Thwaites Brewery in assocaition with The National Trust and BBC Countryfile, in memory of Alfred Wainwright. The shortlist will be announced on 26th March and the winner on 22nd April. The full longlist is
Brittannia Obscura: Mapping Hidden Britain by Joanne Parker
Claxton: Field Notes from a Small Planet by Mark Cocker
Counting Sheep by Philip Walling
H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald
Meadowland by John Lewis-Stempel
On Silbury Hill by Adam Thorpe
Rising Ground: A Search for the Spirit of Place by Philip Marsden
Running Free: A Runner’s Journey Back to Nature by Richard Askwith
The Ash Tree by Oliver Rackham
The Moor by William Atkins
The Walker’s Guide to Outdoor Clues and Signs by Tristan Gooley
Walking Home by Clare Balding

Try a new author and help them to make 6.66p!

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For the eighth year running, US thriller writer James Patterson retains his crown as the UK’s most borrowed author, according to data released today by Public Lending Right.
Six children’s authors are among the top 10 most borrowed authors. They are Daisy Meadows, the brand behind the “Rainbow Magic” series (2nd); former Children’s Laureate, Julia Donaldson (3rd), Francesca Simon, author of the “Horrid Henry” series (4th); Adam Blade (6th); Jacqueline Wilson (7th); and Roald Dahl (10th).
Julia Donaldson commented: “I’m thrilled that my books are being widely borrowed from libraries, which are some of my favourite places. I developed my own love of books in my local library and would quite possibly not otherwise have become a writer myself. When I was the Children’s Laureate and went on a six-week library tour I was impressed with how libraries continue to inspire today’s children, from the popular Rhyme-Time sessions for toddlers through to the homework clubs for schoolchildren. With the closure of so many bookshops the libraries have an added importance, and it’s important that they remain open and at the heart of our communities. It is wonderful to receive my PLR statement each year and I am pleased that PLR has now been extended to audio-books. This comes after many years of authors and their organisations seeking for the inclusion of audio-books in PLR. So, this extension comes as a very welcome development.”

Top 10 Most Borrowed Authors, 2013/14 (2012/13 position in brackets)
1. James Patterson (1) 6. Adam Blade (8)
2. Daisy Meadows (2) 7. Jacqueline Wilson (5)
3. Julia Donaldson (3) 8. Nora Roberts( 6)
4. Francesca Simon (4) 9. Lee Child (12)
5. M C Beaton (7) 10. Roald Dahl (14)
David Walliams is at 74 (up from 157th last year and 430th in 2011/12) in the PLR Top 500 most borrowed authors. Other big risers include Holly Webb (up to 41st from 68th last year) and Valerie Thomas (up to 67th from 115th).
M C Beaton author of the Agatha Raisin and Hamish Macbeth crime fiction books is the most borrowed British author of books for adults, at number five.
Top 10 Most Borrowed Titles, 2013/14
1. Inferno Dan Brown
2. Never Go Back Lee Child
3. A Wanted Man Lee Child
4. Diary of a Wimpy Kid Jeff Kinney
5. Private Down Under James Patterson & Michael White
6. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Last Straw Jeff Kinney
7. Six Years Harlan Coben
8. Second Honeymoon James Patterson
9. Mistress James Patterson & David Ellis
10. The Dying Hours Mark Billingham
Jamie Oliver’s Save With Jamie: Shop Smart, Cook Clever, Waste Less just missed out on a place in the Top 10 Most Borrowed Titles, coming in at number 11. This is a rare appearance in the Top 100 by a non-fiction title.

E L James who was in at No 3 last year with Fifty Shades of Grey does not appear in the Top 100 Most Borrowed Titles list this year.
Public Lending Right (PLR) was established by Act of Parliament in 1979. It gives authors the legal right to receive payment from government each time their books are loaned through the public library system.

In February 2015, PLR will make payments totalling £6 million to 22,053 authors. This year’s Rate Per Loan is 6.66 pence.

Juliet Barker

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For anyone who enjoys history, we have a treat in store on Wednesday 15 April 6 – 8pm.
Historian and biographer Juliet Barker will be joining us to talk about her book England, Arise: The People, the King and the Great Revolt of 1381. The Great Revolt is often called The Peasant’s Revolt. Juliet says ”This is a book of two halves. The first is a snapshot of what English life was really like in town and countryside in 1381 which helps to set the scene for the Great Revolt and explains how and why it happened. The second is a detailed account of the revolt itself, following its course across Essex and Kent then spreading throughout the south east and East Anglia and as far afield as Yorkshire and Somerset. And as anyone who’s read any of my books before will expect, it’s full of entertaining stories which bring the people and period to extraordinary life, from Margery Starre who danced around the bonfire of the Cambridge University archives shouting ‘Away with the learning of clerks! Away with it!’ to the sad tale of John Giboun, who’s evidence was used to convict and hang his own son.”

The evening begins with ‘Skeleton Secrets, 6-7pm. Drop in to chat to the knowledgable staff of Wakefield Museum about medieval bones and what they can tell us about diet and lifestyles of the period.

Juliet will be speaking from 7-8pm, with a chance to buy an autograped copy of her books afterwards.

This is going to be a fascinating evening so book early to ensure a place. The evening is free but please book for the Juliet Barker talk by phoning Wakefield Library on 01924 305376 or emailing wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

Creative Writing with Adult Education

Creative Writing
A group of learners from English classes for learners with dyslexia at Manygates, St Luke’s in South Elmsall and the 5 Towns centre came together recently to attend a Christmas Creative Writing Workshop at Wakefield One. This had been arranged by their tutor, Vanessa Goddard and Lynne Holroyd from Library Services.

Julie Walker, a Reader Development Officer with Kirklees Library Services, hosted the event and worked with the learners on creating a group poem about Christmas. All the learners have limited writing abilities but showed their creative side in putting together a brilliant poem!

The learners really enjoyed the day – asking when they could do it again! Vanessa, the class tutor, was thrilled at how well they had done, saying “When your writing skills are limited you can be overlooked for creative writing ventures but this shows that everyone has potential to write good poetry! With the help of Library Services we are hoping to provide more opportunities for learners to develop their creative writing skills……”

An Ode to Christmas
The man in red gets all the credit
The woman’s stressed about the list
She fights through crowds all hot and bothered
While he’s at home getting……. merry!

But it’s all worth it when you see the faces
Of the children lit up with joy
Making memories to last forever
A gift that time cannot destroy
And on it goes each festive year
We celebrate our Christmas cheer!

For details of other Adult Education Centres and Courses
Email ACES@wakefield.gov.uk or visit the
Website at http://www.wakefield.gov.uk/adulteducation

Requiem

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Award winning author Berlie Doherty will be at Wakefield Library on Thursday 26 March, 2 – 3.30pm. Berlie is famous as the author of over 60 books for children, teenagers and adults, and has written many plays for radio, theatre and television as well as stories set to music and opera librettos. She has been translated into over twenty languages and has won many awards, including the Carnegie medal for both Granny Was a Buffer Girl and Dear Nobody; and the Writers’ Guild Award for both Daughter of the Sea and the theatre version of Dear Nobody.Her latest book is Far from Home, telling the story of what happened to the sisters of Jim, hero of her classic Street Child.
Berlie will be talking about Requiem, a novel for adults, set in rural Ireland and later in Venice. Requiem is the powerful and haunting story of a young woman’s search for self-fulfilment as she struggles against both the love of her close Irish family and the seductive discipline of her convent upbringing.
Join us for afternoon tea on Thursday 26 March to meet Berlie and hear about her work.

Free event but booking is requested please

Wakefield Library and Museum
Wakefield One, Burton Street
Wakefield WF1 2DD
Tel 01924 305376
Email wakefieldlibrarymuseum@wakefield.gov.uk

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